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In an emergency, minutes and even seconds are vital; quick actions can save lives and prevent serious injuries. To remedy emergency situations in a swift and effective manner, your company needs to be ready. Emergency equipment must be properly located and maintained, and staff trained in its use.

Where should emergency equipment be located?

A Hazard Identification process should be conducted to identify all locations where emergency equipment may be required.

This should include equipment such as:

  • Firefighting equipment
  • Drench showers and eye-baths where workers are at risk of being in contact with harmful substances (particularly corrosive substances such as acids).
  • Spill control equipment

Emergency equipment should be located in easily accessible areas and within a reasonable distance from the source of hazard.

Such locations should be sign-posted, including directions from areas where they cannot be seen.

Is training required?

It is essential to train all personnel so that they are thoroughly familiar with the locations of all emergency equipment and the correct methods for using them.

It is also beneficial to ensure that all staff members are familiar with the use and locations of emergency equipment during the induction training process.

What about emergency devices and lights?

Warning devices such as lights, sirens, bells, etc. should be installed in all locations where personnel need to be warned of a hazard or an emergency (e.g. over pressure, release of toxic gasses, etc.). Refer Australian Standard AS 2993.

Emergency evacuation lighting, in accordance Australian Standard 2293 and Local Government requirements should be installed, regularly inspected, and maintained to ensure optimum safety.

Do we need emergency power supply?

It is important to have an emergency power supply for all plant and equipment in the event that your normal power supply is interrupted during an emergency. This should also apply to equipment required in the event of an emergency (e.g. fire, pumps, extraction fans, etc.) and to instrumentation and control systems necessary for safe shut-down.

Battery-powered emergency supply should also be provided in cases that requires it (e.g. for control systems).

Be sure to test and inspect all emergency power supply systems in accordance with a formal schedule.

What maintenance is needed?

To ensure that all emergency equipment is in proper working order, regular inspections and maintenance must be carried out. This will put your equipment in a state of readiness in the event of an emergency.

Enlist qualified personnel to carry out all inspections in accordance with controlled inspection check sheets.

Be sure to keep full records of inspections and testing of emergency equipment.

General advice warning

The information on this site is of a general nature only. It does not take your specific needs or circumstances into consideration. You should look at your own situation and requirements before making any decisions.

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